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Trouble with new nem

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This is him today, I moved him to a corner with a small dip in substrate for him to sit in...hopefully he’s not sick. No one knows what type this is?!?


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PicassoClown

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Yeah condy seem to have pink/purple tips, that was my guess at first. Is that mouth gaping I see? Not a good sign at all but at least it’s open now. I would isolate to box to make sure it gets good flow and lights. Something is definitely wrong with it. I would start researching cipro treatments
 
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Yea he opens and closes from time to time...have him back in the iso box...flows good and lighting is trash honestly...I’ll have a better light over the tank before the end of the day tho


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Doesn’t like the box...likes to be free and seems to dig the new light...we shall c I guess


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webster1234

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I don't think that is a condy. Condylactis are usually more puke brown color with the purple tips. The only time they are white is when they are bleached and unhealthy.

Looks more like a LTA or long tentacle anemone to me. If it is, they are notorious fish eaters. I had one eat (as in completely swallow) a 2 1/2" yellow tang when I was first starting out. It was never happy where I would put it and would routinely release and go floating around the tank. I finally had to return it to the fish store.
 
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webster1234

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This is from Aquariumcreations website:

Tank Recommendations: The Long Tentacle Anemone, Macrodactyla doreensis requires a tank with moderate to high lighting, LED lighting is just fine. They require a low to moderate water movement, but cannot handle anything stronger. Water flow can be turbulent or linear, it doesn't seem to matter. The aquarium should have a variety of sandy and rocky locations as this animal often times can move about and seek refuge in a place it prefers. The Long Tentacle Anemone prefers to bury its foot into the sandy bottom, and will often times attach itself to the bottom of the aquarium glass, where its column is completely buried in the sand for protection. Crushed coral won't work very well with the Long Tentacle as the coral can lacerate its foot. When first introducing this anemone into the display, it is best to try and dig out an area of the sand bed where you prefer it will reside, while decreasing the flow rate during this time so that its not blown around the display. Doing so will allow the anemone time to settle in and bury its foot completely into the sand bed. Once in place, carefully move some sandy substrate around the column and increase the flow rate back to the normal output. Once it is secured, if the Long Tentacle Anemone is happy it will stay put. If it isn't happy and is moving around, be sure to check your lighting and water quality, and also make sure you are feeding it adequately. Be careful with powerheads in marine systems containing anemones, as the animal can and will be killed if caught by the pump intake. All overflow and other similar areas should have their intakes covered with a sponge, to prevent damage should the anemone go wondering around the aquarium.

Food and diet: The Long Tentacle Anemone needs to be fed 1 or 2 times a week. You can feed your Long Tentacle Anemone chopped shrimp, krill, and mussels, fresh chopped fish (from your grocery store), as well as frozen carnivore preparations.

Level of Care: The Long Tentacle Anemone can be difficult to care for because they do have high lighting needs and must be in a large enough aquarium to satisfy their ultimate size. Putting an anemone in a new tank will result in failure. The tank should be at least 1 year old and stable before adding your new M. doreensis.

More Information: Moderate

Reef Compatibility: with caution
 
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